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  • feedwordpress 08:01:45 on 2019/03/24 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , large recipes, Nathan Handwerker, , recipes,   

    “Never eat more than you can lift”*… 


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    meatloaf

     

    350 lb. ground beef
    10 lb. fresh chopped green
    onions
    10 lb. ground celery
    3 doz. eggs
    5 lb. chopped green peppers
    4 (No. 10) cans (12 qt.)
    tomato puree
    12 to 15 lb. bread crumbs
    3 c. salt
    6 to 8 oz. pepper
    1/2 c. Worcestershire sauce

    Gently mix all ingredients in 4 even batches (at least!). Divide
    into approximately 70 loaf pans or pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 1/2 to
    1 3/4 hours with a watchful eye. Makes 1,000 servings

    Just one of the hundreds of recipes one can find at Growlies, “the place to find large quantity recipes.  This one is from the “advanced” section: Really BIG Recipes— meals for 100+.

    [Image above: the 2012 El Cerrito (CA) “Burning Loaf,” a 206.5 pound meatloaf prepared a part of a charity fundraiser… and as an attempt at entering the Guinness Book of Records.  There is a Guinness record for the largest meatball – 1,110 pounds set in Columbus, Ohio, in 2011, and one for the largest Leberkäse, a German liver cheese )also sometimes called a meatloaf); it was set in 2009 in Germany- a whopping 6,874.01 pounds.]

    * Miss Piggy

    ###

    As we ruminate on repasts, we might spare a thought for Nathan Handwerker; he died on this date in 1972.  In 1916, with $300 borrowed from friends, he and his wife Ida started a hot dog stand on Coney Island– and launched what evolved into Nathan’s Famous restaurants and the related Nathan’s retail product line.

    An emigrant from Eastern Europe, Handwerker found a job slicing bread rolls for Feltman’s German Gardens, a Coney Island restaurant that sold franks (hot dogs) for 10 cents each.  Encouraged by a singing waiter there and his piano player– Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante– Handwerker struck out on his own, selling his hot dogs (spiced with Ida’s secret recipe) for a nickel.  At the outset of his new venture, he reputedly hired young men to wear white coats with stethoscopes around their necks to stand near his carts and eat his hot dogs, giving the impression of purity and cleanliness.

    Handwerker named his previously unnamed hot dog stand Nathan’s Hot Dogs in 1921 after Sophie Tucker, then a singer at the nearby Carey Walsh’s Cafe, made a hit of the song “Nathan, Nathan, Why You Waitin?”

     source

    Your correspondent is heading off on a trek to the remoter reaches of the American Southwest, where connectivity will if iffy at best.  Regular service will resume on or around April Fools Day…  appropriately enough.

     

     

     

     
  • feedwordpress 08:01:19 on 2018/06/14 Permalink
    Tags: , , Eddie Cantor, , , , Jimmy Durante, , recipes, Sophie Tucker,   

    “A recipe is a story that ends with a good meal”*… 


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    A recursive recipe is one where ingredients in the recipe can be replaced by another recipe. The more ingredients you replace, the more that the recipe is made truly from scratch

    Dive into some of your favorites (like chocolate chip cookies, above; larger images on the site)– fractal fun at “Recursive Recipes“!

    * Frank Conroy

    ###

    As we noodle on “natural,” we might send tasty birthday greetings to Nathan Handwerker; he was born on this date in 1892.  In 1916, with $300 borrowed from friends, he and his wife Ida started a hot dog stand on Coney Island– and launched what evolved into Nathan’s Famous restaurants and the related Nathan’s retail product line.

    An emigrant from Eastern Europe, Handwerker found a job slicing bread rolls for Feltman’s German Gardens, a Coney Island restaurant that sold franks (hot dogs) for 10 cents each.  Encouraged by a singing waiter there and his piano player– Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante– Handwerker struck out on his own, selling his hot dogs (spiced with Ida’s secret recipe) for a nickel.  At the outset of his new venture, he reputedly hired young men to wear white coats with stethoscopes around their necks to stand near his carts and eat his hot dogs, giving the impression of purity and cleanliness.

    Handwerker named his previously unnamed hot dog stand Nathan’s Hot Dogs in 1921 after Sophie Tucker, then a singer at the nearby Carey Walsh’s Cafe, made a hit of the song “Nathan, Nathan, Why You Waitin?”

     source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 08:01:26 on 2016/05/09 Permalink
    Tags: , brown trout, cook book, , , , recipes, ,   

    “The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me”*… 


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    Although well-known for her massive novels The Fountainhead (about an architectural genius who blows up his own skyscraper) and Atlas Shrugged (about a group of fiercely individualistic anti—union entrepreneurs who band together and go on strike), Ayn Rand was something of a culinary devotee–or so the publication of this hitherto unsuspected book of recipes would suggest.

    Written in her trademark “romantic realist” style, this large collection includes recipes unique to its author, such as “I Need No Warrant for Being Green Beans,” “Rational Pumpkin Muffins of the Highest Intelligence,” and “Chicken Baked Only for Itself.”…

    More– including a recipe for an old standard, made Objectively better– at “Preparing Eggplant Rollatini With the Highest Competence.”

    See also Mc Sweeney’s “Recipes that would be officially approved by the Ayn Rand Institute.”

    * Ayn Rand

    ###

    As we decide to diet, we might recall that it was on this date in 1992, at 11:00 a.m., that the current world record brown trout was caught on the Little Red River in Arkansas by Howard “Rip” Collins.  At forty-pounds, four ounces, it far exceeded the previous record-holder, a 38-9 brown caught by Mike “Huey” Manley of North Little Rock four years earlier.

    Collins and his catch

    source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 09:01:20 on 2015/12/10 Permalink
    Tags: cookies, Declaration of Human Rights, Eleanor Roosevelt, , , , recipes, UN,   

    “If they don’t have cookies in the cookie jar, they can’t eat cookies”*… 


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    The staff of Food52 has gathered a repository of the world’s swellest sweets: 46 different cookies from around the world, each linked to its story and recipe.

    As interestingly, they’ve opened up the drawer, inviting users to post their own favorite cookie recipes, geo-tagged to a world map.

    * Suze Orman

    ###

    As we brush away the crumbs, we might recall that this is Human Rights Day, the date each year on which we celebrate the United Nations General Assembly’s adoption and proclamation, on December 10, 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the first global enunciation of human rights and one of the first major achievements of the new United Nations.

    Eleanor Roosevelt, who chaired the Commission that wrote the Declaration, with the Spanish version

    source

     

     
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