Tagged: Dada Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 08:01:00 on 2017/06/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , Cabaret Voltaire, Dada, , Hugo Ball, , public library, trash,   

    “Many people, myself among them, feel better at the mere sight of a book”*… 

     

    For 20 years, Columbian rubbish-collector Jose Alberto Gutierrez has been holding on to the books he finds while on his rounds in Bogota.

    After two decades his collection totals more than 20,000 books – many of them thrown away by the people of the Colombian capital, now given a new life in the huge library Jose has amassed.  The books take up several rooms in the Gutierrez family home, from where they’re lent out to neighbors through a free community library, which Jose runs with the help of his wife, Luz Mery Gutierrez, and their three children…

    Check it out at: “This dustbin man built a huge public library from books other people had thrown away.”

    * Jane Smiley, Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel

    ###

    As we pile ’em high, we might recall that it was on this date in 1916 that the first and only edition of the magazine Cabaret Voltaire was published, containing work by Hugo Ball, Kandinsky, Jean (Hans) Arp, Modigliani, and the first printing of the word “Dada.”  The (not so) periodical was named for the nightclub that Ball has started earlier in the year in Zurich with help from friends including Arp and Tristan Tzara.

     source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 09:01:43 on 2017/01/22 Permalink
    Tags: , , Dada, , , , Picabia, , sweaters,   

    “I have a sweater obsession, I guess”*… 

     

    More at: “This guy makes sweaters of places and then takes pictures of himself wearing the sweaters at those places.”

    * Drake

    ###

    As we perl one, knit two, we might send challenging birthday greetings to Francis Picabia; he was born (Francis-Marie Martinez de Picabia) on this date in 1879.  A French avant-garde painter, poet and typographist, Picabia experimented with Impressionism and Pointillism before becoming a Cubist. He then became one of the early major figures of the Dada movement in the United States and in France, and was later briefly associated with Surrealism.

    See his work at the major retrospective now hung at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and on their web site.

    Francis Picabia, 1919, inside Danse de Saint-Guy

     source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 08:01:57 on 2014/07/28 Permalink
    Tags: , , Dada, , , , , philosophers, ,   

    “All philosophy lies in two words, sustain and abstain”*… 

     

     source

    To Epictetus’ dictum in the title of this post, one might add “disdain”…

    “That most deformed concept-cripple of all time.”

    Friedrich Nietzsche on Immanuel Kant

    “Hegel, installed from above, by the powers that be, as the certified Great Philosopher, was a flat-headed, insipid, nauseating, illiterate charlatan who reached the pinnacle of audacity in scribbling together and dishing up the craziest mystifying nonsense.”

    Arthur Schopenhauer on Georg Hegel

    “There’s no ‘theory’ in any of this stuff, not in the sense of theory that anyone is familiar with in the sciences or any other serious field. Try to find… some principles from which you can deduce conclusions, empirically testable propositions where it all goes beyond the level of something you can explain in five minutes to a 12-year-old. See if you can find that when the fancy words are decoded. I can’t. So I’m not interested in that kind of posturing. Žižek is an extreme example of it. I don’t see anything to what he’s saying.”

    Noam Chomsky on Slavoj Žižek

    “Well, with all deep respect that I do have for Chomsky, my… point is that Chomsky, who always emphasizes how one has to be empirical, accurate… well, I don’t think I know a guy who was so often empirically wrong.”

    Slavoj Žižek on Noam Chomsky

    “Russell’s books should be bound in two colors, those dealing with mathematical logic in red – and all students of philosophy should read them; those dealing with ethics and politics in blue – and no one should be allowed to read them.”

    Ludwig Wittgenstein on Bertrand Russell

    The hits just keep on coming at “The 30 Harshest Philosopher-on-Philosopher Insults in History” and “Philosophers’ Insults.”

    Special bonuses:  Monty Python’s “Philosophers’ Football” and “Dead Philosophers in Heaven.”

    * Epictetus

    ###

    As we live the examined life, we might send porcelain brithday greetings to Marcel Duchamp; he was born on this date in 1887.  A painter, sculptor, and conceptual artist, Duchamp was, with Picasso and Matisse, one the defining figures in the revolution that redefined the plastic arts in the early Twentieth Century– in Duchamp’s case, as an early Cubist (the star of the famous 1913 New York Armory Show), as the originator of ready-mades, and as a father of Dada.

    In the 1930s, Duchamp turned from the production of art to his other great passion, chess.  He became a competitive player; then, as he reached the limits of his ability, a chess writer.  Duchamp’s   Samuel Beckett, an friend of Duchamp, used Duchamp’s thinking about chess strategy as the narrative device for the 1957 play of the same name, Endgame.  In 1968, Duchamp played an on-stage chess match with avant-garde composer, friend, and regular chess opponent John Cage, at a concert entitled Reunion, in which the music was produced by a series of photoelectric cells underneath the chessboard, triggered when pieces were moved in game play.

    Duchamp (center; his wife Teeny, right) “performing” Reunion with John Cage (left) in 1968

    source

     

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel