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  • feedwordpress 08:01:45 on 2019/03/24 Permalink
    Tags: Coney Island, , , , , large recipes, Nathan Handwerker, , ,   

    “Never eat more than you can lift”*… 


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    meatloaf

     

    350 lb. ground beef
    10 lb. fresh chopped green
    onions
    10 lb. ground celery
    3 doz. eggs
    5 lb. chopped green peppers
    4 (No. 10) cans (12 qt.)
    tomato puree
    12 to 15 lb. bread crumbs
    3 c. salt
    6 to 8 oz. pepper
    1/2 c. Worcestershire sauce

    Gently mix all ingredients in 4 even batches (at least!). Divide
    into approximately 70 loaf pans or pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 1/2 to
    1 3/4 hours with a watchful eye. Makes 1,000 servings

    Just one of the hundreds of recipes one can find at Growlies, “the place to find large quantity recipes.  This one is from the “advanced” section: Really BIG Recipes— meals for 100+.

    [Image above: the 2012 El Cerrito (CA) “Burning Loaf,” a 206.5 pound meatloaf prepared a part of a charity fundraiser… and as an attempt at entering the Guinness Book of Records.  There is a Guinness record for the largest meatball – 1,110 pounds set in Columbus, Ohio, in 2011, and one for the largest Leberkäse, a German liver cheese )also sometimes called a meatloaf); it was set in 2009 in Germany- a whopping 6,874.01 pounds.]

    * Miss Piggy

    ###

    As we ruminate on repasts, we might spare a thought for Nathan Handwerker; he died on this date in 1972.  In 1916, with $300 borrowed from friends, he and his wife Ida started a hot dog stand on Coney Island– and launched what evolved into Nathan’s Famous restaurants and the related Nathan’s retail product line.

    An emigrant from Eastern Europe, Handwerker found a job slicing bread rolls for Feltman’s German Gardens, a Coney Island restaurant that sold franks (hot dogs) for 10 cents each.  Encouraged by a singing waiter there and his piano player– Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante– Handwerker struck out on his own, selling his hot dogs (spiced with Ida’s secret recipe) for a nickel.  At the outset of his new venture, he reputedly hired young men to wear white coats with stethoscopes around their necks to stand near his carts and eat his hot dogs, giving the impression of purity and cleanliness.

    Handwerker named his previously unnamed hot dog stand Nathan’s Hot Dogs in 1921 after Sophie Tucker, then a singer at the nearby Carey Walsh’s Cafe, made a hit of the song “Nathan, Nathan, Why You Waitin?”

     source

    Your correspondent is heading off on a trek to the remoter reaches of the American Southwest, where connectivity will if iffy at best.  Regular service will resume on or around April Fools Day…  appropriately enough.

     

     

     

     
  • feedwordpress 09:01:18 on 2019/01/20 Permalink
    Tags: , Cesar Hildalgo, Coney Island, , , LaMarcus Adna Thompson, , , , ,   

    “Time moves in one direction, memory in another”*… 


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    lennon

    A few years ago a student walked into the office of Cesar A. Hidalgo, director of the Collective Learning group at the MIT Media Lab. Hidalgo was listening to music and asked the student if she recognized the song. She wasn’t sure. “Is it Coldplay?” she asked. It was “Imagine” by John Lennon. Hidalgo took it in stride that his student didn’t recognize the song. As he explains in our interview below, he realized the song wasn’t from her generation. What struck Hidalgo, though, was the incident echoed a question that had long intrigued him, which was how music and movies and all the other things that once shone in popular culture faded like evening from public memory.

    Hidalgo is among the premier data miners of the world’s collective history. With his MIT colleagues, he developed Pantheon, a dataset that ranks historical figures by popularity from 4000 B.C. to 2010. Aristotle and Plato snag the top spots. Jesus is third…

    Last month Hidalgo and colleagues published a Nature paper that put his crafty data-mining talents to work on another question: How do people and products drift out of the cultural picture?…

    Hidalgo explains the two ways that people and events drop from our collective memories at “How We’ll Forget John Lennon.”  Explore Pantheon here.

    * William Gibson

    ###

    As we muse of memory, we might recall that it was on this date in 1885 that LaMarcus Adna Thompson received the first patent for a true “switchback railroad”– or , as we know it, a roller coaster.  Thompson has designed the ride in 1881, and opened it on Coney Island in 1884.  (The “hot dog” had been invented, also at Coney Island, in 1867, so was available to trouble the stomachs of the very first coaster riders.)

    Thompson’s original Switchback Railway at Coney Island

    source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 08:01:19 on 2018/06/14 Permalink
    Tags: Coney Island, , Eddie Cantor, , , , Jimmy Durante, , , Sophie Tucker,   

    “A recipe is a story that ends with a good meal”*… 


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    A recursive recipe is one where ingredients in the recipe can be replaced by another recipe. The more ingredients you replace, the more that the recipe is made truly from scratch

    Dive into some of your favorites (like chocolate chip cookies, above; larger images on the site)– fractal fun at “Recursive Recipes“!

    * Frank Conroy

    ###

    As we noodle on “natural,” we might send tasty birthday greetings to Nathan Handwerker; he was born on this date in 1892.  In 1916, with $300 borrowed from friends, he and his wife Ida started a hot dog stand on Coney Island– and launched what evolved into Nathan’s Famous restaurants and the related Nathan’s retail product line.

    An emigrant from Eastern Europe, Handwerker found a job slicing bread rolls for Feltman’s German Gardens, a Coney Island restaurant that sold franks (hot dogs) for 10 cents each.  Encouraged by a singing waiter there and his piano player– Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante– Handwerker struck out on his own, selling his hot dogs (spiced with Ida’s secret recipe) for a nickel.  At the outset of his new venture, he reputedly hired young men to wear white coats with stethoscopes around their necks to stand near his carts and eat his hot dogs, giving the impression of purity and cleanliness.

    Handwerker named his previously unnamed hot dog stand Nathan’s Hot Dogs in 1921 after Sophie Tucker, then a singer at the nearby Carey Walsh’s Cafe, made a hit of the song “Nathan, Nathan, Why You Waitin?”

     source

     

     
  • feedwordpress 09:01:36 on 2015/02/03 Permalink
    Tags: , Coney Island, , , Kinfolk, Kinspiracy, Steeplechase Park, The Joker, Tilyou,   

    “Artistic tricks divert from the effect that an artist endeavors to produce”*… 


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    After spending much time on Instagram, a pattern quickly revealed itself: covers of Kinfolk magazines, wood, American flags, lattes, etc.

    These similarities popped uo without even trying to look for them specifically, and so, a project was born. Not out of spite, but out of a fascination with the redundancy of almost identical subject matter.

    Four images, one Instagram account per set. A whole lotta the same shit.

    Welcome to the Kinspiracy…

    Kinfolk Magazine: making white people feel artistic since 2011″– more at The Kinspiracy.

    * Paul Rand

    ###

    As we contemplate composition, we might send amusing birthday greetings to George C. Tilyou; he was born on this date in 1862.  Tilyou was the man most responsible for turning Coney Island into a entertainment destination.  Having open the first theater there, he began to experiment with rides, most successfully with a copy of the Ferris Wheel that he saw on his honeymoon at the Columbian Exhibition.  (Tilyou tried to buy that one, but as it was already promised to the upcoming St Louis World’s Fair, he built a replica.)

    He parlayed those rides into an attraction: Steeplechase Park, known round the world for its trademark “funny face” logo.

    Any resemblance to Batman’s nemesis, The Joker, is not coincidental: illustrator Bill Finger, who co-created the character attests to being influenced by the Steeplechase Park mascot.

    The Park’s unique appeal lay in its power to involve visitors…

    Many rides were calculated to play with gravity and so encourage couples to grab a hold of each other. In addition to the famous Steeplechase, which took its customers down a wavy track on mechanical horseback, the attractions included the Human Roulette Wheel, the Human Pool Table, the Whichway and the Barrel of Love, which spun humans in directions they’d never been spun in before. Equally involving was the Blowhole Theater–a stage built into an exit that forced customers to become actors, as they endured blasts of air and electric shocks to the delight of other recent victims.

    Steeplechase burned down in 1907, but Tilyou didn’t miss a stride. After charging admission to the burning ruins, he rebuilt the park, this time introducing the roofed Pavilion of Fun. After Tilyou died in 1914, various managers took their turn running Steeplechase, although ownership remained in the family. The park finally closed in 1964, ending what amounted to a 69-year run of comic relief from the modern world.

    American Experience

     source

     

     

     
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